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Creeks to Coast

Terri Waters | Looking Up Mylor Creek

Looking Up Mylor Creek

Looking past the moored yachts up Mylor Creek towards Mylor Bridge on the south coast of Cornwall with Cockwells new boatyard building on the far bank. There has been a boatyard on the creek at Tregatreath for centuries and with the new upgrade it looks like there will be one here for many more years to come.
Terri Waters | Unloading The Catch

Unloading The Catch

Fishermen unloading the morning catch in Mylor. Mylor Yacht Harbour was originally the most westerly Naval Dockyard and victualling station in England, then home of HMS Ganges and the Packet ships and centre for the French Resistance during the Second World War. Mylor, now a busy fishing harbour and home to the last fleet of Oyster fishing boats under sail, is a haven for water-lovers of all types, whether you enjoy crabbing with the children off the pontoon, cruising local waters or racing further offshore.
Terri Waters | May Morning At Mylor Creek

May Morning At Mylor Creek

I went out early as the sun was trying to break through a heavy morning sea mist and knew it would be a wonderful time to head off with my camera down to Greatwood Quay opposite Mylor Harbour in Cornwall. As the haze lifted over Mylor Creek and the houses started to appear on Church Road that had earlier been hidden it turned into a stunning late May day.
Terri Waters | The Roseland Through The Mist

The Roseland Through The Mist

The Roseland Peninsular appearing out of the sea mist behind the yachts moored in Mylor Harbour just off Carrick Roads on the south coast of Cornwall near Falmouth.
Terri Waters | Mylor In The Mist

Mylor In The Mist

A misty late spring morning in Mylor Bridge. When opening my curtains and seeing the new day I knew I had to walk down to Mylor Creek. A calm and misty early morning is always so peaceful and perfect for a walk when all that could be heard were the birds and the occasional jumping fish. A great way to start a day.
Terri Waters | Crantock Cornwall

Crantock Cornwall

Cornish hedges are very special. The typical Cornish hedge is a stone-faced earth hedgebank with plants, bushes or trees growing along the top. It is called a hedge, never a hedgerow or wall and they are a haven for wildlife. The Jack and Jill herringbone-patterned slate hedges of North Cornwall are very picturesque with their beautiful wild flowers. Below the wild flower meadows of West Pentire is Crantock beach on the western side of the Gannel estuary, next to the resort of Newquay.
Terri Waters | Bedruthan Steps From Carnewas Cliff Path

Bedruthan Steps From Carnewas Cliff Path

The landscape of the rugged north Cornwall coast is synonymous with shipwrecks and smugglers, and from the spectacular Carnewas clifftop views look out over Bedruthan Steps, where a rank of colossal, pointed stacks stand tall against a dramatic backdrop making it one of the most popular destinations on the Cornish coast.
Terri Waters | The Paths To Bedruthan Steps

The Paths To Bedruthan Steps

The landscape of Cornwall is synonymous with shipwrecks and smugglers and spectacular clifftop views of the Atlantic waves against a dramatic backdrop. From the cliff paths at Carnewas on the north coast the tops of the rock stacks at Bedruthan Steps can be glimpsed. A vessel shipwrecked by one of the towering stacks in 1846 littered the beach with barrelled beef and printed cloth.
Terri Waters | Crantock And The Gannel

Crantock And The Gannel

Crantock Beach is a broad sand-dune backed strand between the twin headlands of Pentire Point East and Pentire Point West; Pentire meaning headland. The Gannel estuary in North Cornwall separates Crantock from Pentire Point East and the town of Newquay.
Terri Waters | Portreath Tide

Portreath Tide

Sitting on the beach watching the angle of tide coming in at Portreath on the north coast of Cornwall it was obvious why only slightly crazy experienced locals surf on the harbour side of the the beach. The waves come around the western headland and crash into the harbour wall at an angle, running the full length of it when the swell is up, taking any unsuspecting surfer along too. In 2018 the force of Storm Eleanor managed to destroy a section which had to be rebuilt.
Terri Waters | Breaking Waves Portreath

Breaking Waves Portreath

The Pepper Pot and Monkey Hut catch the winter sun at Portreath on the north coast of Cornwall as the tide comes in and waves break on the beach
Terri Waters | Misty Morning At Restronguet Weir

Misty Morning At Restronguet Weir

The view of moored boats and the Roseland from Restronguet Weir beach on the south coast of Cornwall on a misty autumn morning.
Terri Waters | Gull Rock Portreath In Winter

Gull Rock Portreath In Winter

Gull Rock (yes, another big rock off the Cornwall coast named Gull Rock) is one of the most recognisable feature of Portreath along with the Monkey Hut and Pepper Pot. It isn't surprising these islands get the name gull rock as it is where all the sea birds gather to rest and shelter from high winds.
Terri Waters | Autumn Morning

Autumn Morning

Autumn in Mylor is beautiful as the trees change colour on the banks of the creek and many of the migrating birds with their various calls and whistles stop for a visit.
Terri Waters | Perranporth Blue

Perranporth Blue

The return of the tide on a clear winter day at Perranporth Beach Cornwall
Terri Waters | Perranporth Late Afternoon

Perranporth Late Afternoon

Perranporth Beach Cornwall late afternoon in winter
Terri Waters | Old Cadgwith A Very Cornish Harbour

Old Cadgwith A Very Cornish Harbour

Cadgwith is a tiny picturesque fishing village located on the eastern side of the Lizard Peninsula in Cornwall, England. All around the cove are reminders of the past - old pilchard cellars, winches, the old lifeboat house that was used until 1963, memories of much-loved fishermen who lost their lives at sea. All are carefully preserved and yet still form part of everyday life.
Terri Waters | Perranporth Colours

Perranporth Colours

The colours in the late afternoon sky in winter at Perranporth Beach Cornwall are reflected in the wet sand.
Terri Waters | Perranporth Waves

Perranporth Waves

The tide is on the turn at Perranporth Beach in Cornwall and the wind takes the tops off the waves.
Terri Waters | Perranporth Tide

Perranporth Tide

Perranporth Beach Cornwall as the tide comes in on a cold winters day.
Terri Waters | The Workhorses Of St Agnes

The Workhorses Of St Agnes

The rusty machines used on St Agnes beach to launch the boats. St Agnes on the north Cornwall coast has breathtaking scenery and a sandy beach which is revealed at Trevaunance Cove at low tide.
Terri Waters | The North Cornwall Coast

The North Cornwall Coast

The rugged cliffs of the north Cornwall coast at St Agnes are a dramatic contrast to the tranquil turquoise sea on a beautiful summer day. Tucked into a stunning and unspoilt spot on the north Cornish coast, St. Agnes sits in both a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and a World Heritage Site.
Terri Waters | St Agnes Beach

St Agnes Beach

Trevaunance Cove is the main beach at St Agnes. A large area of rocks, the old harbour and a labyrinth of caves to explore are revealed at low tide.
Terri Waters | St Agnes Coast

St Agnes Coast

A view of the north Cornwall coast from St Agnes towards West Pentire. Tucked into a stunning and unspoilt spot on the north Cornish coast, St. Agnes sits in both a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and a World Heritage Site. Trevaunance Cove is the main beach at St Agnes. A large area of rocks, the old harbour and a labyrinth of caves to explore are revealed at low tide
Terri Waters | St Agnes Valerian

St Agnes Valerian

The dense clusters of deep pink, almost crimson flowers, of Red Valerian on the clifftop at St Agnes. The dramatic coastline of St Agnes makes for breathtaking scenery enhanced by beautiful displays of wildflowers.
Terri Waters | Summer Flowers In St Agnes

Summer Flowers In St Agnes

Tucked into a stunning and unspoiled spot on the north Cornish coast, St. Agnes sits in both a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and a World Heritage Site. The village is picturesque and retains a traditional friendly Cornish atmosphere.
Terri Waters | Wildflower Coast

Wildflower Coast

Wild flowers adorn the cliffs at St Agnes. The dramatic coastline of makes for breathtaking scenery.
Terri Waters | Trevaunance Cove St Agnes

Trevaunance Cove St Agnes

ucked into a stunning and unspoilt spot on the north Cornish coast, St. Agnes sits in both a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and a World Heritage Site.
Terri Waters | Looking Out To Sea

Looking Out To Sea

Looking out to sea over the cliffs at St Agnes. St Agnes is a picturesque village on the north coast of Cornwall with breathtaking scenery from the clifftops.
Terri Waters | Out To Sea

Out To Sea

St Agnes was home to one of the tin and copper mining industries in Cornwall. Many of the old engine houses can be seen around the area. Trevaunance Cove was used as a harbour for the St Agnes Mines and the remains of it can still be seen through the crystal clear water.
Terri Waters | The Crowns Coastline

The Crowns Coastline

As I was sitting on the cliffs above the sea at Botallack on the north coast of Cornwall my mind turned to all those brave miners who risked their lives between 1815 and 1914 in the tunnels that went out under the sea, for over a mile in places. Storm Ciara was approaching and the sound of the waves hitting the cliffs was amazing but, if I had been underground it might not have been so exciting. The Crowns Engine Houses are symbolic not only of the decline of the Cornish mining industry but the daring of the adventurers and the courage of Cornish miners who went deep underground.
Terri Waters | Storm Ciara Approaching Botallack Crowns

Storm Ciara Approaching Botallack Crowns

As I was sitting on the cliffs above the sea at Botallack on the north coast of Cornwall my mind turned to all those brave miners who risked their lives between 1815 and 1914 in the tunnels that went out under the sea, for over a mile in places. Storm Ciara was approaching and the sound of the waves hitting the cliffs was amazing but, if I had been underground it might not have been so exciting. The Crowns Engine Houses are symbolic not only of the decline of the Cornish mining industry but the daring of the adventurers and the courage of Cornish miners who went deep underground.
Terri Waters | The Crown Engine Houses At Botallack

The Crown Engine Houses At Botallack

As storm Ciara approached the far west of Cornwall, I headed down to Botallack to shoot the Crowns Engine Houses perched perilously on the steep granite cliffs near St Just on the north coast. The thunderous sounds of the mining machines are long gone but the sound of the wind and the sea was deafening as the waves hit the rocks. The Crowns were built around 1815 to pump water and allow submarine mining, or mining under the sea bed. Tunnels were cut over a mile out under the sea where there was a rich copper lode, the shafts were sunk to a depth of 350 fathoms. The miners were so brave.