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Herts, Beds and Bucks

Graham Carnduff-Youngg | Winters Dawn in The Chilterns

Winters Dawn in The Chilterns

A perfect cold, frosty, misty dawn in the Vale of Aylesbury near the village of Wingrave in Buckinghamshire
Graham Carnduff-Youngg | Ashridge Bluebells

Ashridge Bluebells

A stunning array of bluebells at Dockey Wood in Ashridge Forest, Herfordshire
Graham Carnduff-Youngg | Cottage in a Poppy Field

Cottage in a Poppy Field

Keepers Cottage near Tring in Hertfordshire with a field of wild poppies in the foreground
Graham Carnduff-Youngg | Reedbed on Marsworth Reservoir

Reedbed on Marsworth Reservoir

Tring Reservoirs is a group of four reservoirs close to Tring on the border of Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire, England. Their purpose is to feed the Grand Union Canal. Marsworth Reservoir, built in 1806, is 24 acres, a large part of the reservoir is a designated nature reserve.
Graham Carnduff-Youngg | Morning Mist in The Vale of Aylesbury

Morning Mist in The Vale of Aylesbury

A beautiful spring morning in The Vale of Aylesbury near the village of Wingrave
Graham Carnduff-Youngg | The Whipsnade White Lion

The Whipsnade White Lion

The Whipsnade white lion can be found just over a mile south west of Whipsnade village and 1 mile North of Dagnall on the Dunstable downs in south Bedfordshire. It is situated facing west on a gentle slope below Whipsnade wildlife park. These downs are a continuation of the range of chalk upland that also includes the Chiltern hills and the Berkshire downs. The end of the Ridgeway long distance footpath is 2 miles away to the West at Ivinghoe beacon, which offers a good view of the lion as do other hills to the west. The gentle slope makes the lion difficult to view from close quarters.
Graham Carnduff-Youngg | Evening Reflections at Marsworth

Evening Reflections at Marsworth

Tring Reservoirs is a group of four reservoirs close to Tring on the border of Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire, England. Their purpose is to feed the Grand Union Canal. The four reservoirs are: Startops End, Marsworth, Tringford and Wilstone. These reservoirs adjoin each other, separated only by paths and roads; the fourth, Wilstone Reservoir, is a short distance to the west, close to the village of Wilstone.Wilstone Reservoir is the largest of the quartet at 119 acres (48 ha). Built in 1802, it is up to 18 feet (5.5 m) deep and has a capacity of 240 million imperial gallons. Wilstone reservoir supplies water to the Wendover arm of the Grand Union Canal. Startops End Reservoir, built in 1817, is much smaller at 26 acres; Marsworth Reservoir, built in 1806, is 24 acres; and the smallest, Tringford Reservoir, was built in 1816
Graham Carnduff-Youngg | Sunset Over Startops End

Sunset Over Startops End

Tring Reservoirs is a group of four reservoirs close to Tring on the border of Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire, England. Their purpose is to feed the Grand Union Canal. The four reservoirs are: Startops End, Marsworth, Tringford and Wilstone. These reservoirs adjoin each other, separated only by paths and roads; the fourth, Wilstone Reservoir, is a short distance to the west, close to the village of Wilstone.Wilstone Reservoir is the largest of the quartet at 119 acres (48 ha). Built in 1802, it is up to 18 feet (5.5 m) deep and has a capacity of 240 million imperial gallons. Wilstone reservoir supplies water to the Wendover arm of the Grand Union Canal. Startops End Reservoir, built in 1817, is much smaller at 26 acres; Marsworth Reservoir, built in 1806, is 24 acres; and the smallest, Tringford Reservoir, was built in 1816
Graham Carnduff-Youngg | The Sunlit Path

The Sunlit Path

The evening sub shining through the trees onto the path that runs alongside Marsworth Reservoir at Tring in Hertfordshire.
Graham Carnduff-Youngg | Marsworth Reservoir, Tring

Marsworth Reservoir, Tring

Marsworth Reservoir in the evening sunshine.Marsworth Reservoir is one of the group of reservoirs collectively known as Tring Reservoirs, originally built to supply water to the Grand Union Canal system, the reservoirs are now an important nature reserve, home to a wide variety of waterfowl and other aquatic creatures.