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Shropshire

Mary Fletcher | Ludlow Castle

Ludlow Castle

Ludlow Castle is a ruined medieval fortification in the town of the same name in the English county of Shropshire, standing on a promontory overlooking the River Teme. The castle was probably founded by Walter de Lacy after the Norman conquest and was one of the first stone castles to be built in England. During the civil war of the 12th century the castle changed hands several times between the de Lacy's and rival claimants, and was further fortified with a Great Tower and a large outer bailey. In the mid-13th century, Ludlow was passed on to Geoffrey de Geneville who rebuilt part of the inner bailey, and the castle played a part in the Second Barons' War. Roger Mortimer acquired the castle in 1301, further extending the internal complex of buildings, and the Mortimer family went on to hold Ludlow for over a century.
Mary Fletcher | A house between two trees

A house between two trees

Patshull Hall can be seen in the background between the two old trees. This country house is now privately owned and divided into appartments, but was once the residence of the Earl of Dartmouth. The surrounding land is owned by the Crown.
Mary Fletcher | Bandstand, The Quarry

Bandstand, The Quarry

This bandstand, which stands below the entrance to the Quarry in Shrewsbury, was built in 1879 and donated to the park by the Shropshire Horticultural Society. The bandstand is used by military bands during Shrewsbury Flower Show. Other uses include as a dry place for people practising fire arts, and other activities which require shelter from the rain. Between 2006 and 2008 the bandstand had a DJ playing music on most Saturdays during the day.
Mary Fletcher | St Chad's Church, Shrewsbury

St Chad's Church, Shrewsbury

St Chad's Church, Shrewsbury occupies a prominent position in the county town of Shropshire. The current church building was built in 1792, and with its distinctive round shape and high tower it is a well-known landmark in the town. It faces The Quarry area of parkland, which slopes down to the River Severn. The church is a Grade I listed building.
Mary Fletcher | Ludlow, Shropshire

Ludlow, Shropshire

Ludlow is a market town in Shropshire, England. The town is significant in the history of the Welsh Marches and neighbouring Wales. The town is near the confluence of the rivers Corve and Teme. The oldest part is the medieval walled town, founded in the late 11th century after the Norman conquest of England. It is centred on a small hill which lies on the eastern bank of a bend of the River Teme. Atop this hill is Ludlow Castle and the parish church, St Laurence's, the largest in the county. From there the streets slope downward to the River Teme, and northward toward the River Corve. The town is in a sheltered spot beneath Mortimer Forest and the Clee Hills, which are clearly visible from the town.
Mary Fletcher | Porthill Bridge, Shrewsbury

Porthill Bridge, Shrewsbury

Porthill Bridge, also often referred to as Port Hill Footbridge, is a suspension bridge for pedestrians crossing the River Severn in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England. It connects Porthill with the Quarry and the town centre. Next to it on the Porthill side is the Boathouse public house and Becks Field is also. Both that and The Quarry are large areas of greenery. The bridge experiences significant vibration, even when few people are crossing it.
Mary Fletcher | Welsh Bridge, Shrewsbury

Welsh Bridge, Shrewsbury

The Welsh Bridge is a masonry arch viaduct in the town of Shrewsbury, England which crosses the River Severn. It connects Frankwell with the town centre. It is a Grade II* listed building. The bridge was designed and built from 1793 to 1795 by John Tilley and John Carline (whose father was a mason on the English Bridge), who had built Montford Bridge for Thomas Telford. Four of the arches span 43 feet 4 inches, while the fifth and central arch is 46 feet 2 inches. The bridge is 30 feet wide, and built from Grinshill sandstone. In total it is 266 feet long. It was completed in 1795 at a cost of £8,000.